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Please help children like Lincoln at Christmas

Lincoln is 8 years old and spends a lot of his time trying to keep up with his younger sister and brother! He loves playing with them even though it tires him out.

Lincoln was diagnosed with Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) at 2 years old. DMD is a debilitating genetic condition that causes a gradual loss of muscle function affecting everyday movements and activities.

It is seen more often in boys than girls, and usually leads to wheelchair use by their teenage years if not before. Historically, children with DMD did not survive beyond their late twenties although thankfully some are now living significantly longer.

A young boy pretending to drive a car

DMD is a debilitating genetic condition that causes a gradual loss of muscle function affecting everyday movements and activities. It affects 1 in 3500 male births worldwide.

Although medical interventions and knowledge have improved significantly over the years, there is still no cure for DMD. Lincoln also has the added challenge of not being eligible for NDIS support.

This is where Montrose stepped in. As soon as Lincoln’s diagnosis was received, Montrose has provided therapy sessions at no cost to the family as well as advising on equipment and providing social work support to help with the initial diagnosis.

Lincoln’s step mum, Sophie explains: “He’s such a happy kid. He’s full of life and loves being around his younger sister and brother. He does get sore sometimes but he refuses to let his condition defeat him.”

As well as living with DMD, Lincoln is also non-verbal and has been diagnosed with autism.

“It can be difficult for him to explain when he is tired or sore,” says Sophie.

Recent support from Montrose has focused on Lincoln’s communication needs. Montrose Speech Pathologists have worked on strategies to help Lincoln communicate. With the support of his school, he is learning sign language and is able to write his own name.

“Watching him develop his communication ability over the last few years has been phenomenal. It’s much easier now that he can let us know if he needs a rest.”

Quote reading: It is seen more often in boys than girls, and usually leads to wheelchair use by their teenage years if not before. Historically, children with DMD did not survive beyond their late twenties although thankfully some are now living significantly longer. Although medical interventions and knowledge have improved significantly over the years, there is still no cure for DMD. Lincoln also has the added challenge of not being eligible for NDIS support. This is where Montrose stepped in. As soon as Lincoln’s diagnosis was received, Montrose has provided therapy sessions at no cost to the family as well as advising on equipment and providing social work support to help with the initial diagnosis. Lincoln’s step mum, Sophie explains: “He’s such a happy kid. He’s full of life and loves being around his younger sister and brother. He does get sore sometimes but he refuses to let his condition defeat him.”
Young boy on a swing in a park

 As well as Speech Pathology, Lincoln has had support from a Montrose Physiotherapist and Occupational Therapist when required. Montrose has recently provided support to meet Lincoln’s equipment needs. This is something that can become more important as DMD progresses.

“He’s just had support from Montrose to get a mechanical bed He isn’t using all of the functions yet but it is really important to have that in place for when it is needed. He’s so happy with it. It’s very comfortable and it gets us ready for the future.” says Sophie.

Your support is vital

If you would like to support children like Lincoln at Christmas, please make a donation today.

All donations over $2 are tax deductible and a receipt will be provided.

Montrose provides vital support for children with a disability and has a long history supporting those with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Thanks to previous donors to Montrose, therapy can continue for children like Lincoln who could otherwise fall through the cracks.